Reviews


“[W]hy don’t Anglo-American conservatives praise the EU? Rohac does. He argues persuasively that the EU is a force for peace and prosperity that, on balance, promotes the precepts of the libertarian philosopher Friedrich Hayek. He argues that rather than seek to weaken Brussels, conservatives should work to strengthen and reform EU institutions. […] [A]n original corrective to unthinking (and often mendacious) Euroskepticism on the right.”

-Andrew Moravcsik, Foreign Affairs

“[A] formidable defense of the rationale of the European project.” “[A] powerful metaphysical argument for maintaining the union.”

Brendan Simms, The Wall Street Journal

“Rohac […] is a true-blue conservative who wrote a series of articles harshly criticizing EU policies such as farm subsidies. While standing by those criticisms, he writes that “in the past two years, I have come to the realization that, for all its flaws, the European project has been beneficial for the continent.”

Peter Coy, Bloomberg Businessweek

“Towards an Imperfect Union: A Conservative Case for the EU is his succinct and compelling argument for European integration and unity at a moment of severe distress and challenge. Published on the eve of the referendum on Britain’s relationship to the EU, this book could not have been released at a more critical time.”

James Kirchick, The Weekly Standard

“[U]ndoubtedly a serious and well referenced work that deserves proper consideration.”

Roland Smith, Medium.com

Blurbs


“If you think that ‘Euroscepticism’ is a conservative project, then think again: Dalibor Rohac makes the Hayekian case for the European Union – and it will surprise you.”

-Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning author

“Dalibor Rohac has written a very important book: He convincingly undermines the arguments of the fundamentalist opponents of the European Union while equally skillfully unmasking its weaknesses and excesses and pointing out what are the necessary reforms in the EU.”

-Leszek Balcerowicz, Professor of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, Chairman of the Board, FOR Foundation, and former Minister of Finance, Poland

“There is a conservative, freedom-based case for the European Union, and this book is the very best place to find it. This is a highly original and readable treatment of some of the most important issues facing the world today.”

-Tyler Cowen, Holbert L. Harris Professor of Economics, George Mason University, General Director, Mercatus Center

“In this timely and convincing study, Dalibor Rohac holds up not just the European Union but integration itself as the best road to peace and prosperity — and he does so from a conservative perspective. His message is critically important for those on the right and on the left who are in the process of undermining the West’s single most outstanding achievement since World War II. “

-Charles Gati, Professor of European and Eurasian Studies, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies

“Timely, powerfully argued and well researched — Rohac nails the factual errors and logical flaws in the conservative Eurosceptic case.”

-Edward Lucas, Senior Editor, The Economist

Dalibor Rohac’s ‘Towards an Imperfect Union’ is perfectly timed before the British referendum on staying or leaving the European Union.  Nor could his  ‘Conservative Case for the EU’ be more precisely targeted. The author has the perfect credentials too: a Central European Thatcherite working at the Republican-leaning American Enterprise Institute.  Conservatives — that is people whom Edmund Burke and Adam Smith would recognize as such — should urgently consider what is nostalgia for the world of Westphalian nation-states and what is the least bad really existing arrangement for the European half of the Western world.  Mr. Rohac provides persuasive arguments for improving rather than dismantling the EU.  A welcome voice of reason in a dangerously unhinged world.

-Radosław Sikorski, Senior Fellow, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University, former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Poland